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Some Immigrants Losing Ability to Work

Some Immigrants Losing Ability to Work

USCIS is an incompetent organization.

They cannot perform the basic tasks assigned to the bloated, bureaucratic agency.

And people are starting to take notice.

CNN recently told the sad story of Dayana Vera de Aponte.

Dayana used to work as a registered behavior technician for special needs children in Florida.

But she had to stop working because the clowns at USCIS cannot or will not reissue a work authorization card.

Many immigrants in the U.S. are eligible to work and they obtain formal permission to work by filing an I-765 Application for Employment Authorization.

The processing times for these work authorization cards, or EADs, keep being pushed back by USCIS.

Sadly, what is happening to Dayana is happening to immigrants around the entire U.S., including some of our clients.

We have actually started suing USCIS for delays in processing and approving EAD requests.

And those EAD lawsuits have worked thus far.

As CNN points out, when an immigrant loses their job due to USCIS’s inability to properly process the application and create a new work card, they are not the only ones who lose.

Our economy is already suffering from a lack of qualified workers in many types of jobs.

Employers are also suffering because USCIS’s incompetence is forcing them to stop employing qualified workers.

An information technology company had to lay off 5 of its 1,000 employees because their foreign-born employees had not received their work authorization in a timely fashion.

According to USCIS statistics, there is an “unprecedented backlog” of 1.4 million work permit applications.

This includes both initial applications and EAD renewals.

Immigrants’ inability to get work authorization renewed or issued also usually means that they lose the ability to drive an automobile as most states tie the ability to obtain a drivers license to the ability of the immigrant to demonstrate that they are in valid legal immigration status.

The piece also tells the story of Abelardo Rios, a telecommunications employee in Florida.

Rios was suspended from his job last week. He’s been waiting for USCIS to issue a work permit renewal since February of 2021.

Mr. Rios is the sole breadwinner of the family.

Ten years ago, a work permit took about 6-8 weeks to be approved and issued.

In our firm, we hear constantly from current clients and potential new clients regarding the slowdown at USCIS when it comes to processing work card applications.

USCIS says that is aware of the backlog.

But are they doing anything about it?

Who is sounding the alarm?

Not sure anyone is really paying attention.

What a joke.

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